“Victory is Equality”: Paris, France

View in Montmarte

Last summer Chris and I spent a long weekend in Paris for the World Cup (USA vs. Chile). We had fun exploring the city while also attending our first women’s soccer football match.

 Hôtel de Ville is the home of the city’s local administration and was completed in 1357.

This was my first time in Paris–only my second time in France–and because of our limited time in the city I was forced to narrow down what we could see on our visit. With a day spent in Versailles and a second at the match, we were pretty limited with what we could fit into our remaining day and a half in the city. Sadly, the catacombs were closed on our only available day for a tour, so that will have to be scheduled for our next trip to France’s capital.

The Pantheon (“Temple of the “Republic”) was built in 1791 and was originally a church.
Latin Quarter

I’m so thankful to have the opportunity to not only visit, but also see the US women play in person. Paris is beautiful (no shocker there) and I was admittedly a little overwhelmed by the sheer size of the city and all there it is to do. Here’s the thing: You can definitely feel the pressure to “check items off the list” but my recommendation is to pick what is both feasible and interesting for you and go that route!

Also an excuse to post Ewan McGregor in Moulin Rouge gifs.

Where are we?

The largest and most populous city in France, Paris is known for its architecture and art, along with being one of the most expensive cities in the world (second only to Singapore in 2018). There is so much to see and do! We used the subway system as much as possible not only to save money but also sustainability things; opened in 1900, the metro is the second busiest in the world with over five million passengers daily.

Porte Saint Denis was built in 1672 and is 24 meters (80 feet) tall.

Known as “the City of Light” for both the role the city played in the Age of Enlightenment and literally as one of the first European locations to use gas lighting on a large scale, the area of Paris was first inhabited by the Parisil, a sub-tribe of the Celtic Senones around 3rd century BC and was first named Lutetua.

In 1901, the city’s population grew to over two million inhabitants including a number of artists from around the world–painter Pablo Picasso and author Marcel Proust–and after WWI, the city continued to be a mecca for artists: Josephine Baker, Allen Ginsberg, and Ernest Hemingway, among so many others. African American artists including Baker and acclaimed author James Baldwin found Paris to be an escape from the segregation and injustice they faced in America during this time.

On June 14th, 1920, the Nazis marched into Paris and ordered French police to arrest the city’s Jewish population. 12,844 people were detained (including over four thousand children) for five days before being sent to Auschwitz; none of the children survived. Today France has the largest Jewish population in Europe, although with growing anti-Semitic violence in the country, many have relocated to other countries in the past five years.

Tour Saint-Jacques (Saint-Jacques Tower) is the only remaining building of the Church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie. Built in 1509 and demolished in 1797 during the French Revolution, the tower is 52 meters (171 feet) tall.

With over 1803 monuments, 173 museums, and 450 gardens and parks throughout the city, Paris offers something for any visitor. Thankfully, we saw a couple of monuments, gardens, and of course cemeteries, while in the city. Paris is first in the world for number of libraries–830!–but unfortunately I wasn’t able to visit any; add it to the list for our next visit!

One of the best aspects of visiting Paris was merely wandering around the city, of course my favorite pastime. Meandering the beautiful streets, armed with coffee and a list of eventual destinations, I loved spending our long weekend here.

The Sites:

Jardin du Luxembourg (Luxembourg Garden):

Luxembourg Palace was built from 1615-1645, originally as the royal residence for regent Marie de’ Medici, the mother of King Louis XIII, but now is the seat of the Senate of the Fifth Republic (since 1958).
Marie’s palace was inspired by her native Florence. Today the gardens contain 23 hectares and includes a number of statues, fountains, and pathways.
View of the Panthéon from the garden.
We walked the gardens on a beautiful summer day (so thankful for the lovely weather) right after brunch. Much needed after treating ourselves to southern food!

Shakespeare and Company:

Shakespeare and Company was at the top of my must-visit list. First opened by Sylvia Beach in 1919, the store was known as the center for American literature and culture in Paris. Closed in December 1941 as the Germans occupied France–supposedly because Beach refused to give a German officer her last copy of Finnegans Wake, a true queen–this location never re-opened, even after the war ended.
George Whitman opened the new Shakespeare and Company in 1951 on the site of a 16th century monastery. James Baldwin, Allen Ginsburg, William S. Burroughs, and many other literary icons spent time here. A “socialist utopia masquerading as a bookstore”, the gorgeous shop also includes beds for aspiring writers. Whitman’s daughter, Sylvia (named after Sylvia Beach) currently runs the store. Henry Miller called Shakespeare and Company “a wonderland of books” and I have to agree; I loved this place.
The epitome of a Parisian bookstore.
(Via Gavin Ford)

Place Josephine Baker:

In 2000 this square was named for American Josephine Baker, a performer and spy during WWII. Known for her dancing, Baker called France her second home.

The Moulin Rouge:

The famous red mill of the Moulin Rouge was co-founded by Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller and is known as the birthplace of the can-can dance.
Ewan McGregor, Nicole Kidman, John Leguizamo, AND Jim Broadbent?! Truly this film did what the others COULDN’T do.

Notre-Dame de Paris:

The Notre-Dame cathedral caught fire less than a month before we traveled to France. Constructed between 1163-1345, the building was badly damaged when the roof and spire were destroyed in 2019.
The cathedral is currently closed and under renovation with an expected completion date of 2024, in time for the 2024 Summer Olympics, which will be held in Paris.
One of the larger concerns with the Notre-Dame fire is health impact of the toxic dust created by the burning of the lead used in the cathedral’s roof and spire. 250 tons of lead were burned during the fifteen hour-long blaze.
Teams of scientists are currently working inside of the cathedral: restoring artifacts, attempting to safely remove burned scaffolding, and addressing contamination from the lead.

The Eiffel Tower:

We didn’t actively seek out the Eiffel Tower as I have zero interest in heights whatsoever, but happily we saw Paris’s tallest structure in a number of places. This is the view from the metro station on our way to Versailles.
The “cultural icon” of Paris opened in 1889 and is the most-visited paid monument in the world.
View of the Tower during our walk home from the World Cup.

Cimetière de Montmartre (Montmarte Cemetery):

The third largest necropolis in Paris, the Montmarte Cemetery was opened on January 1st, 1825.
The cemetery is located on an abandoned gypsum quarry that was used as a mass grave during the French Revolution.
Many famous artists are buried here including Emile Zola and Francois Truffant.
Our walk through the cemetery was a nice break from the busy city.
The cemetery is located under the busy Rue Caulaincourt.
Dozens of cats live here! We saw a couple sunning themselves on mausoleums.

View from the Seine:

Other Sites:

Saint Joseph des Carmes was constructed from 1613-1620.
The College of Sorbonne was founded in 1253.
The Paris Opera was founded in 1669 by Louis XIV.
Les Grands Boulevards
Nicolas Flamel’s former house is the oldest stone home in the city of Paris and was built in 1407. Legend holds that Flamel discovered the Philosopher’s Stone and was the inspiration behind the first Harry Potter novel that featured the Stone’s Elixer of Life.
59 Rivoli is a must-visit! It was unfortunately closed while we were in Paris, but we saw how the famous “artist-squat” was decorated for the World Cup: a banner stating “la victoire est l’égalité” meaning “victory is equality”.
59 Rivoli was renovated by the city and reopened in 2009 . The building includes six stories of artist studios and is known for its changing facade.

World Cup Match:

Attending a World Cup match was an absolute dream come true. I still can’t believe we were lucky enough to see the US women play in person.
Again, so thankful for this opportunity and the gorgeous weather. We traveled to the match by metro but walked home, using the crowded public transportation as an excuse to see more of the city.

Restaurants & Pubs:

Soul Kitchen:

Soul Kitchen offered the space I was looking for while in Paris–a bistro table on the sidewalk complete with great coffee and a beautiful view of the city. The restaurant’s interior is absolutely adorable with a ton of great brunch options and a menu written on a door that is brought to you when you order.

Break Time:

Ah, kebabs. Thankfully there were two kebeb restaurants near our hotel and Break Time was an inexpensive and convenient stop for a quick meal. They offered kebabs in cheese naan bread (!!) that was awesome.

Treize au Jardin:

My famous number one brunch of 2019 was enjoyed at Treize au Jardin. I essentially planned our trip around brunch and soccer, obviously.
Southern brunch is one of the things I miss most about living in Charleston. Treize au Jarden did not disappoint with their version of tomato pie (my all-time favorite breakfast food) and pimento cheese biscuits.
Still dreaming of this adorable cafe. AN ABSOLUTE MUST-VISIT. Take my word on this.

La Recyclerie:

I absolutely loved La Recyclerie! Located in Montmartre, this former train station turned restaurant/cafe/work-space takes sustainability seriously. The space includes DIY workshops, seed swaps, and while we were there, a community activism discussion. Reused mismatched furniture and a view of the restaurant’s garden and chickens made this a cozy spot for coffee (only a Euro a cup! In Paris!).
Not to mention their affordable cocktails.
The restaurant’s menu changes daily based on the availability of their urban farm. I had a lovely vegetable pasta our last night in the city.

🤍Paris

Currently:
Reading: Busted in New York and Other Essays (Darryl Pinckney)
Listening: Blunderbuss (Third Man Records)

Today’s Rain is Tomorrow’s Whiskey: Edinburgh, Scotland

View from Edinburgh Castle and one of the times I’ve broken my strict “never climb an old volcano” vow.

Sigh, Scotland. Edinburgh has been at the absolute top of my travel list since I first saw Danny Boyle’s (equally both amazing and scarring) Trainspotting. 

Well, but me and Scotland

Edinburgh is a gorgeous city filled with a ton of history, culture, and of course, whiskey. Get ready for a loooooong post filled with Scottish adventures including murder legends (obviously), cocktail villages, and of course #alltheharrypotterthings. Somehow I even managed to find Russian pierogi (but are any of us actually surprised?)

Old Town, Edinburgh

Where are we?

The capital of Scotland, Edinburgh is the seventh largest city in the United Kingdom. Its name derives from the Brittonic Celtic word “Eidyn” and although the meaning is unknown, scholars believe the term references Castle Rock, the location of Edinburgh’s Castle. Castle Rock was formed over 350 million ago out of volcanic rock. Often compared to Rome, Edinburgh was built on seven hills.

Earliest human inhabitation of the area goes all the way back to 8500 BC. In 1706, the Treaty of the Union combined the Parliaments of Scotland and England to form the Parliament of Great Britain. This was largely opposed by many Scots, which led to numerous riots in Edinburgh. During the Jacobite rising of 1745, Edinburgh was occupied by the rebel Jacobite Highland Army until their defeat by the British at the Battle of Culloden. Scotland remains a part of the United Kingdom today.

Or as we all know, the premise to the first season of Outlander.

Known for its distilling, brewing, and printing industries, the city’s Old Town has its trademark smoke-stained buildings and the winding, cobblestone streets feel like you’re stepping out of a Harry Potter novel, which of course makes sense because much of J.K. Rowling’s inspiration for the series came from the time she spent in the city.

There is so much to see in Edinburgh! We only had a couple of days but you could easily spend a week just wandering and exploring this beautiful, historic city.

The Sites:

Overwhelmed by all the things Edinburgh has to see? SAME. Friendly reminder that you can find all of the sites (including my personalized Harry Potter walking tour) in the Middle World Adventures map.

Trainspotting Dreams Coming True:

First #myheartisexploding moment came immediately after exiting the bus from the airport into the city. Our stop on Princes Street is the location of the infamous “Choose Life” scene at the beginning of Trainspotting, when Renton and Spud are being chased by police officers.

While the storefronts have changed (there’s now a Next department store and a greeting card shop), it was still such a cool nerd moment for me to be standing at that stop.

Lovely Places:

The National Art Gallery of Scotland first opened in 1859.
The beautiful Princes Street Gardens
St. Giles’ Cathedral contains buildings built in 1124.
The Merchants Hall in New Town

True Crime Spots:

I wish we had time for a tour of the Surgeons’ Hall Museum! They have the Burke Death Mask on display. William Burke, half of the infamous Burke & Hare team, murdered 16 people in Edinburgh during the early 1800s. During the time there was a huge demand for bodies by anatomy schools in Edinburgh; Burke & Hare delivered the corpses of their lodgers for cash. After being discovered by police, Hare was granted immunity for confessing the murders. Burke was hanged and his skeleton (and face mask) was put on display where it remains today.
The view from Mary King’s Close. A “close” is an ancient alleyway and Mary’s is one of Edinburgh’s most famous as well as most haunted sites in the city. This passageway (to the left of the picture) is named after Mary King, an affluent merchant who lived here in 1635. After years of disease (including haunting descriptions of the bubonic plague and how it was treated yikes), overcrowding, and poor living conditions, the Close became a site for underground trading. Parts have been demolished, but a portion under the city remains open for tours.
View from Grassmarket: Grassmarket was the site of public executions in Edinburgh. One of the most famous stories is that of Maggie Dickson. The wife of a fisherman who deserted her and left her destitute in 1723 (#boybye), Dickson left the city for Kelso. There, she found work for an Innkeeper and also fell in love with the Innkeeper’s son. After becoming pregnant, Dickson gave birth to a premature baby who passed away a few days later. The baby’s body was found, traced to Dickson, and she was charged under the contravention of the Concealment of Pregnancy Act and the murder of her son. After being found guilty, she was sentenced to death and hanged in the Grassmarket Gallows on September 2nd, 1724. After being pronounced deceased, her body was transported to Musselburgh, where, on the way, she awoke. Since the sentence had been carried out, Dickson could not be tried again, and she lived another forty years with her husband (boy, welcome back, I guess).

Harry Potter Tour:

Nicolson’s Cafe, now Spoon, is where J.K. Rowling wrote many of the chapters of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. This plaque is located at the corner of Drummond Street.
The entrance to George Heriot’s School, J.K. Rowling’s inspiration for Hogwarts.
Me about to break into Hogwarts (via Kristin Ariel Photography)
Victoria Street is rumored to be the inspiration for Diagon Alley.
Greyfriar’s Kirkyard is a graveyard near Old Town that was established in 1861.
One of the graves, Tom Marvolo Riddle, is said to have been the inspiration for J.K. Rowling ( He-Must-Not-Be-Named’s dear old dad)
Searching For Tom Riddle’s Grave: Our Edinburgh Adventure
One of my absolute favorite places in Edinburgh. I could have easily have spent hours here just wandering around. Photo credit to Casci for capturing me #livingthatbackpacklife

Scottish International Storytelling Festival 2018:

It was a (very) happy coincidence to visit Edinburgh during their 2018 Storytelling Festival. While I was hopping-up-and-down-ecstatic at all the nerdy possibilities, my friends were the absolute best and came along on a couple of stops. Unfortunately, due to the limited time we had in the city, I could really only see a couple of exhibitions.

Absolutely breathtaking to see in person!
The National Library of Scotland featured an exhibition of the work of Frederick Douglass. Douglass, born an American slave in 1818 and making his escape to freedom in 1838, is one of the most famous activists of the anti-slavery movement. He arrived in Edinburgh in 1846. The exhibition was amazing.

Edinburgh Castle:

Image by Kristin Ariel Photography
View from the trek up to Edinburgh Castle
Photo by Kristin Ariel Photography

Jack White:

We saw the always amazing Jack White during his Boarding House Reach Tour.
I only cried twice. Okay, three times.

Restaurants & Pubs:

My Favorite Meals in Edinburgh:

The Painted Rooster: We found the Painted Rooster for breakfast and happily, take-home pierogi. I had vegetarian haggis while a friend braved his first haggis tasting. After speaking to the Russian server and owner, Chris and I 100% brought back to-go pierogi, promptly eating them as soon as we were back in Hungary.
Elephant & Bagels: The most adorable cafe located smackdab in the middle of our Harry Potter tour, Elephant & Bagels has a great menu and was absolutely packed when we stopped for lunch. I had my go-to: everything bagel with honey, brie, and walnuts.

Edinburgh Cocktail Week:

Happily, we were in town for the 2018 Edinburgh Cocktail Week and were able to visit the Cocktail Village–a large tent filled with the city’s best bars and their unique cocktails created just for the event.
We loved the Cask Smugglers stand (Kristin Ariel Photography)
Our favorite stand was the Pop Up Geeks! They were fully immersed in the world of Willie Wonka (Kristin Ariel Photography). I was 1000% fan-girling the bartender.
I love this so much.
Best Marketing ever?
❤ this girl! (Kristin Ariel Photography)

Whiskey & Folklore Class

How can you not sign up for a whiskey and folklore class while in Edinburgh? We attended this class and had a blast. Our host discussed the history of whiskey distilling in Scotland as well as the city’s best true crime murder stories (be still my heart). It was an amazing start to our trip. Whiskey tasted: Auchentoshan (Lowlands), Glenlivet (Highlands), Old Pulteney (Wick). and my favorite, Lagavulin (Islay).

The Pop Up Geeks:

The Pop Up Geeks is an absolute must-visit while in Edinburgh. Every few months they choose a different nerdy theme and apply it comprehensively to the entire bar including the menu, the decor, and the marketing. While we were visiting it was everything Lord of the Rings (“There and Back Again”). My friend Kristin was SO EXCITED and not being a LOTR fan myself, I was just thrilled to be there with her. Make sure to reserve your spot.
Photo Credit: Kristin Ariel Photography

Shops:

Located on Victoria Street, John Kay’s Shop is a beautiful combination of new and antique books right in the heart of Edinburgh. I was eyeing a couple of special edition Brontë novels but exercised my limited self-control and purchased postcards instead.
“Smell the Old Books for Yourself!” proclaims Armchair Books, a used bookstore located in West Port near Grassmarket. The “very nearly” organized chaos of this shop made my heart incredibly happy.
Absolutely adored this bookstore.
Happily, Bonkers Gift Shop was located right next to our Air BnB and I was able to pick up on all of my favorite tourist purchases: strange, hand-drawn postcards, obscenely specific greeting cards, and various pet-related gifts. So cute.

Edinburgh absolutely tops the list of my favorite places. I can’t wait to plan our next trip.

Darling, I love you more than whiskey.
(Kristin Ariel Photography)

Extra special thank you and love to Kristin Earwood, an insanely talented photographer and wonderful friend. Check out her amazing work here.

Currently:

Reading: Josephine Baker’s Last Dance (Sherry Jones)

Watching: Lorena (Amazon)

Listening: Boom! Lawyered (Re.Wire: Season 2)

Year in Review: 2018

How is it already January? Anyone else feel like the winter Olympics were last month (probably just me)?

November and December have been absolutely crazy months for us. We were in six different countries (seven if you count a week in the UK during mid-October) including about a month away from home. I’m REALLY far behind on updating everyone on the amazing places we’ve been this year, along with the continuous atrociousness that is USA Gymnastics, Michigan State University, and the USOC (spoiler alert: it’s even worse if that’s possible, but I’m sure you already guessed that). 

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Because we’re in a new year and I love making lists, this post will include 2018’s #allthethings : life things, my favorite things, traveling things, food things. You know, my usual rambling.

Here’s the Thing: Sometimes Life is Good and Bad.

Like most things, 2018 was both wonderful and terrible. This year I was forced to really start to put a lot of my own experiences in perspective; a combination of the #metoo movement, Nassar victim impact statements, and constant discussion of abuse made avoiding my own history inescapable. I learned that I need to start taking my emotional and mental health more seriously rather than continue my usual tactic of ignore, ignore, ignore.

I learned that I’m not alone.

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Bratislava, Slovakia: One of the best memories of this year is streaming the Larry Nassar sentencing from my phone with a friend in a Slovakian speakeasy. A pretty perfect representation of my 2018.

This year I laughed until my stomach hurt, sat at the edge of the world, and ate an obscene amount of sweets with my coffee. I was able to see my family, my friends, and experience new places with the people I love. I had carrot cake cheesecake for my birthday, walked Prague with two of my favorite boys (Ike and Chris), won a fantasy football true crime league, and hosted more get-togethers than I can count.

Looking back, my heart is both broken and full. I’m so incredibly thankful for everything I have and accomplished this year.

There is pressure during the new year to make a fresh start. In a lot of ways a new beginning sounds great, but in a lot ways it doesn’t.  I’m in a sort of weird in-between limbo right now. And you know what? That’s fucking okay. I am striving to just be content with where I’m at rather than put pressure on myself to move too quickly (one of my intentions for 2019).

Saying Goodbye:

Ike in 2016.

Before I start my lists, I want to take a moment to speak on one the hardest months of my life. In January Ike was diagnosed with terminal cancer and given weeks to live. We were completely devastated. At only eight years old and in great health, the diagnosis came as a complete shock.

My little bandit.

Ike came from a longggggg line of Boston Terriers; we adopted his grandad Skittles when I was in middle school. He (and Porkchop) have always been such a constant in my life that letting him go was one of the absolute most difficult things I’ve ever had to do.

Thankfully the diagnosis proved to be incorrect in that the masses on his liver and pancreas weren’t in fact cancer. That news however, was coupled with the fact that the small mass in his chest (right between his lungs and heart) could prove to be fatal.

Best of brothers.

After two months of chemotherapy, I had high hopes that he could recover. Ike was a tough and stubborn dog; his abdominal masses were shrinking and he was doing great. When he started having issues breathing I hoped it might just be due to the change in the weather. Unfortunately, it wasn’t. The mass in his chest was growing. And there was nothing we could do to stop it.

Look at these babies! Ike was constantly judging everyone.

The vet told me this was a difficult way to pass away… and we would know when the end was here. We didn’t want our best boy to suffer. Even now, I can’t even talk about that day and the morning I had to make that decision, never knowing if it was right. I’m just so incredibly thankful to Chris, my friends here in Papa and far away, my family, and of course,  Porkchop and Arya.

Ike and his new sister Arya in 2017. She actually found the skin issue on the back of his neck (you can see it here in the picture too) that led to us beginning the tests.

I still expect him to grumpily come inside out of the rain or itch his face on the covers every morning. Chris still looks for him when he comes back from traveling for work. Arya and Porkchop were both really confused at first, but I think are doing better. PC really misses his little brother. We all miss this little guy.

Ike’s favorite pastime: sunning himself. On his last day with us he had all the sun.

I don’t really know how to end this except to say how heartbroken I still am. Some days are easier. Other days are really hard. If you’re reading this and are working through something difficult that happened to you this year, just know that you’re not alone. And its 100% okay to feel sad or guilty or angry or a combination of any and all the emotions. 

Best Places of 2018:

This year we saw incredible new places and had the opportunity to visit old favorites.

The Giant’s Causeway, Northern Ireland

Places we visited in 2018:

  • Belfast (and the coast), Northern Ireland
  • Berlin, Germany
  • Budapest, Hungary
  • Bratislava, Slovakia
  • Charleston, USA
  • Cleveland, USA
  • Dresden, Germany
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • Kethely, Hungary
  • Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Lisbon, Portugal
  • Peniche, Portugal
  • Prague, Czech Republic
  • San Francisco, USA
  • Seville, Spain
  • Vienna, Austria
  • Zagreb, Croatia

I’m extremely thankful to have the chance to visit a couple of our favorite spots with friends and family who made the leap over the ocean to spend time with us in Europe.

Fisherman’s Bastion, Budapest

Choosing my absolute favorite places is virtually impossible. Taking into account a number of factors, here are my picks for 2018 (in no particular order):

Coast of Northern Ireland

Christmas in Zagreb

Seville, Spain

Edinburgh, Scotland

Honorable mentions go to Budapest because of so many reasons, but specifically the Budapest Beer Week that was absolutely awesome.

Favorite Concerts of 2018:

This year was THE year of shows for us. We saw a ton of our usual musicians (Pokey LaFarge) and a couple of new ones (FINALLY Flight of the Conchords went on tour). Here’s a list of everyone we saw live in 2018:

  • A Perfect Circle
  • Flight of the Conchords
  • Franz Ferdinand
  • Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three
  • They Might be Giants
  • Jack White

My favorite shows of 2018:

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Middle school Ashlyn was absolutely ecstatic to see Franz Ferdinand. They were great–full of energy and fun–and sold out a huge space. 100% recommend. (Prague, Czech Republic)

Flight of the Conchords at Capitol Theatre

Finally saw Flight of the Conchords in real life. (Dublin, Ireland)

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Of course Jack White is at the top of the list. He was amazing (as always) and just as incredible as when we first saw him play in 2005. (Edinburgh, Scotland)

Special shout-out to Jane Goodall, who spoke in Budapest this year. Technically not a band, but it was truly a dream come true to see her in real life.

Favorite Books of 2018:

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via Cutiosities on Etsy

This year I surpassed my goal and read 41 books! 2018 was definitely a year of nerding out both in fiction and non-fiction. I joined a couple of book clubs (one here in Papa that connects readers from all over the world, Now Read This! A NYT/NPR collaboration, and of course Emma Watson’s Our Shared Shelf). My favorites are definitely influenced by a lot of the personal struggles I had this year. Here are my top books published in 2018:

#8. Things We Haven’t Said: Sexual Violence Survivors Speak Out (Erin E. Moulton): An anthology of stories of sexual assault, Things We Haven’t Said is a powerful book on why survivors struggle with speaking out on their experiences through providing an outlet to victims who typically don’t have one.

#7. Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Kate Manne): A professor of philosophy at Cornell University, Manne states that misogyny is “a social and political phenomenon with psychological, structural, and institutional manifestations” that enforce gender roles that continue to influence society today. Detailing the impact of these ideas both culturally and institutionally, Manne’s book provides context on why we expect (and allow, and in some ways, forgive) actions of one group of people over another. 

#6. Heart Berries: A Memoir (Terese Marie Mailhot): Mailhot’s memoir is raw and at times difficult to read. A Native author, this beautifully written book details her life in crisis: poverty, overcoming multiple disorders, losing custody of her child, growing up with an absent mother, and life on the Seabrid Island First Nation Indian reservation in British Columbia. 

#5. A Perilous Path: Talking Race, Inequality, and the Law (Sherrilyn Ifill, Loretta Lynch, Bryan Stevenson, and Anthony C. Thompson): This slim book (128 tiny pages) is a discussion on race in America by the leading civil rights leaders in the field. Their conversation on inequality and changing culture and institutions was one of my favorites this year.

#4. Where the Crawdads Sing (Delia Owens): Owens’ first novel, Where the Crawdads Sing is a gorgeously written story of a girl growing up alone in the marshes of North Carolina. I adored not only the descriptions (it reminded me so much of Charleston) but also Kya’s story of persevering on her own and in her own way.  

#3. Educated (Tara Westover): I finished Tara Westover’s memoir in two absolutely brutal days. Educated tells the remarkable story of Westover’s life from being born (sometime, her actual date of birth is unknown) to survivalist parents.  Their mistrust of medicine and education meant that she had very little experience of the outside world. Her desire and determination to leave home for education (eventually a PhD and at the disapproval of her family) is one of the most incredible (and impressive) stories I’ve read all year.

#2. One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying our Democracy (Carol Anderson): Anderson discusses the implications of the 2016 election–the first in fifty years to be held without the complete protections of the Voting Rights Act–and how voter suppression systematically blocks the ability of many Americans to submit their ballots. Her work details the impact of Jim Crow and voter requirement laws implemented after the abolishment of slavery, the systematic disenfranchisement of black voters leading up to the Civil Rights Act, and the continuous suppression through various laws and redistricting today. 

#1. I’ll be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer (Michelle McNamara): My favorite book of 2018 is McNamara’s account of her obsession to help catch one the of the most horrifying rapists and murderers in United States history, the Golden State Killer (a name she coined). I’ll be Gone in the Dark is so well-written that you feel her passion and dedication to find the man who assaulted more than fifty woman and killed ten people on each page. The chilling final chapter–McNamara is speaking directly to GTK–and her prediction of how he might be caught is eerily similar to way it actually happened in reality, although she passed away unexpectedly before he was arrested.

There are also a ton of great books I read this year that were published before 2018 including Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram W. Kendi and The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. 

Favorite Brunches of 2018:

It’s no surprise that brunch is my absolute favorite meal. Here are my favorites from 2018:

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#8. Blueorange (Vienna, Austria): This everything bagel from Blueorange was one of the best breakfast sandwiches I had in 2018 (a big accomplishment considering Chris is the king of making them). Brie, honey, walnuts, and greens… what else do you need in life?

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#7. Munchy Food Truck (Zagreb, Croatia): Who says it isn’t appropriate to order a homemade waffle covered in Nutella and bananas at 10am? If you dip it in coffee, it counts as breakfast.

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#6. Holy City Brewing (Charleston, SC): It’s no secret that HCB has my favorite brunch in Charleston. My last minute visit meant I had only one Sunday for brunch and this crunchwrap was absolutely the best decision I made all summer.

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#5. Urban House (Bratislava, Slovakia): The best Bloody Mary of 2018! Look at this amazing spread. My favorite dish is their vegetarian English breakfast–the greens are the tastiest part of the meal.

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#4. Maggie May’s (Belfast, Northern Ireland): Maggie May’s has the absolute best diner food. A small, cash-only restaurant in Belfast, their menu is extensive and the food is so genuinely good.

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#3. La Jeronima (Seville, Spain): This croissant was stuffed with roasted eggplant and honey marinated tofu (I can feel the collective “ugh” from meat-eaters reading this and the “ooooh!” from my veg friends haha). This tiny cafe in Seville had such a unique menu that I wish we were able to have breakfast there every day.

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#2. Copenhagen Coffee Lab & Bakery (Lisbon, Portugal): So here’s the thing–I love a solid avocado toast and this was hands-down the best I had all year. Heather and I chose this PLUS sweets with no regrets. Not pictured is the hot ham breakfast sandwich that Chris ordered that smelled so good, Karl had to get one for himself (second breakfast for the win).

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#1. 3FE (Dublin, Ireland): Look at this scotch egg! These hash browns! In addition to their amazing menu 3FE also hosts coffee tastings and training for those interested in learning more about roasting their own blend. This tiny cafe earns my favorite brunch of 2018.

Favorite Podcasts of 2018:

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I love podcasts. Sometimes I don’t turn on our TV for what feels like weeks because (nerd alert) I’ve discovered a new show and binged all the episodes in a few days. Similar to my book choices, my favorite podcasts are heavily influenced by a lot of my personal struggles and growth this year. Here are my favorite podcasts published in 2018:

#8. Believed (National Public Radio): The goal of Believed is to answer the question so many people have asked: How did Larry Nassar get away with decades of abuse to hundreds of girls and women? Their interviews with survivors and parents can be an extremely difficult listen, but necessary if we want to learn how to change the system that allowed for this abuse to occur for so long. 

#7. Keep It! (Crooked Media): Keep It! is my weekly guilty pleasure podcast. Hosted by Ira Madison III, Kara Brown, and Louis Virtel, they hilariously discuss the intersection of pop culture and politics. Kara also has my favorite frustrated statement of 2018: “people just need to read!”

#6. Uncivil (Gimlit Media): The only reason Uncivil isn’t number one on my list is because  most of their episodes were published in 2017 and therefore didn’t qualify as a “2018” show. Discovered late this year, this was one of my binges of 2018. Each episode “ransacks America’s past” and tells an untold story related to the Civil War.

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#5. My Favorite Murder (Exactly Right): My favorite true crime podcast, MFM is hosted by Karen Kilgarariff and Georgia Hardstark. Each week they share stories of murder, cults, and hometown stories from listeners. Not only discussing true crime, Karen and Georgia are also super open about their own struggles with mental health, finding time for self-care, and sparked a million taglines including the famous “stay sexy and don’t get murdered”, “you’re in a cult, call your dad”, and my personal favorite: “can’t you see from my really thick black eyeliner that I’m no one’s mother?”

#4. R U Talkin’ REM: Re: ME? (Earwolf): As stated by Scott Aukerman, it truly is the year of R U Talkin’ REM Re: Me. Hosted by the superfan Adam Scott Aukerman (Adam Scott [Parks & Rec] and Aukerman [the hugely underrated Comedy Bang Bang!]), this podcast discusses the impact of R.E.M.’s music album by album. Their banter is hilarious and each episode is filled with smaller episodes (“Is this an episode of ‘I Love Films?'”) that Chris and I always played during our hours on the road this year. 

#3. GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast (Gymcastic): Definitely a niche podcast for fans of the sport, Gymcastic makes the top of my list not only because of their analysis of the sport (and mostly hilarious takes on competition, scoring, and love for the athletes) but their unrelenting dedication to discussing the Larry Nassar abuse that finally began to garner mainstream media coverage this year. Each week hosts Jessica and Spencer held MSU, USA Gymnastics, and the USOC accountable and provided an outlet to athletes and survivors. Their coverage of not just the abuse, but of the cover-up and mismanagement makes Gymcastic one of the my favorites this year. 

#2. Serial Season Three: The Cleveland Court System (This American Life): Rather than focus on one particular story (unlike seasons one and two) season three instead tells the “extraordinary stories of ordinary stories” taking place at a courthouse in Cleveland. These  largely untold narratives of people working through the complicated (and convoluted) justice system was one of the most frustrating and heartbreaking podcasts I listened to in 2018. 

#1. Scene on Radio Season Three: Men (The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University): I loved season two (“Seeing White” featuring Dr. Chenjerai Kumanyika, host of Uncivil) so I was really looking forward to season three of Duke University’s podcast. With the goal of discussing “How did we get sexism, patriarchy, misogyny in the first place? How can we get better at seeing it, and what can we do about it?” hosts Jown Biewen and Celeste Headlee tackle a topic each week and provide feedback on how we can combat these systems. The episode “Himpathy” was the most difficult and impactful for me; it featured input from Kate Manne on not only why survivors of abuse feel sympathy for their abusers, but also how society does as well. 

Extra love to Pardon My Take and Fantasy Football Focus, which I binged throughout the entire NFL season. 

Favorite TV Shows of 2018:

This year I hardly watched any new shows (too much reading and podcasting I suppose) so my list is embarrassingly small. But here are the shows you absolutely need to watch:

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#5. Ballers Season Four: If you know me, you’re not surprised by this choice. Listen, I love the Rock. I love Rob Cordray. I love football. Is this a ridiculous show? Yes. Do I love it? Yes. Does the plot matter? Nah, not really.

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#4. Better Call Saul Season Four: One of my favorite shows continues to get better with this newest season. Bob Odenkirk and Jonathan Banks are still absolutely amazing as Saul and Mike. The return of Gus Fring (one of the best characters of Breaking Bad) makes this season binge-worthy for sure. The season finale nearly gave me a heart attack.

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#3. End of the F***ing World: Technically the show premiered in the UK in 2017, but it wasn’t picked up and added to Netflix until 2018, so it counts for me. I loved this show. Jessica Barden and Alex Lawther are superb as Alyssa and James. Their relationship is endearing, odd, and their adventure to find her birth father completely drew you into the show; the final episode was amazingly filmed. I’m so glad it was picked up for a second season.

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#2. Game of Thrones Season Seven: Finally, this year I got into GOT. I always begrudgingly sort of paid attention to the show over the years but never committed (why is everyone so dirty?) until this year. Maybe call it the revenge of Arya Stark or the undeniable affection I have for Tormund, but I’m 100% in moving forward. Better late than never.

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#1. Sharp Objects: Yep, Sharp Objects beats Game of Thrones for me. The combination of Amy Adams, Patricia Clarkson, and Eliza Scanlen gives me LIFE. Incredibly creepy and at times jarring, Sharp Objects was my favorite show of 2018. Closer was my favorite episode that also creeped me out the most.

Here’s to 2019!

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Currently Reading: My Sister, the Serial Killer (Oyinkan Braithwaite)

Currently Watching: Ozark Season 1 (Netflix)Ashlyn (2)

 

 

 

Things I’m Loving 10.25.2016

To Watch: Peaky Blinders and The Office (again)

Similar to House of Cards, Peaky Blinders has been on my list forever and I’m just now getting around to watching it.

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If you haven’t seen the show I definitely recommend it; Cillian Murphy plays the leader of the Peaky Blinders, a criminal gang in post WWI England. The three seasons are on Netflix and not only have a ton of great actors including Sam Neil, Tom Hardy, and Helen McCroy, but the cinematography is gorgeous, the soundtrack is awesome, and the story is insane. Murphy does an ahhhhh-mazing job portraying Tommy. Get ready for lots of cigarettes and Jameson shots.

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After finishing Dexter, Chris and I moved on to watching the Office in our random free time together. We just finished season seven and are taking a break before moving on to the post-Michael seasons. I’ve definitely cried at least four times (Pam and Jim going on their first date, Pam and Jim getting married, Michael and Holly getting engaged, Michael leaving, Dwight reading a Harry Potter bedtime story… the list goes on and on).

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A good reminder of when I had “Sometimes you just have to be the boss of dancing” as my email signature. #professionalsupervisor

The Office is just SO. GOOD. It was good when it first aired and it’s still good now. It’s too hard for me to pick a favorite character because they’re all great in their own way, but I have to say that Creed’s random one liners are just the best.

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Maybe because I’m a creepy old man deep down in my heart?

I’m nervous to finish the last two seasons–I never really watched consistently after Michael left–so I’m hoping for the best that it can be without Steve Carell. The last season of Scrubs so severely impacted me that I’m a little terrified to continue.

To Play: Jack White’s Acoustic Recordings 1998-2016

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I think everyone knows my love for the great Jack White so this inclusion is definitely unsurprising.

Acoustic Recordings is exactly that–an album of old and new acoustic songs from The White Stripes, The Raconteurs, The Dead Weather, and Jack’s solo work. Record #1 I almost feel like was made just for me and includes all of my favorite songs from the older White Stripes albums. “Apple Blossom”, “I’m Bound to Pack it Up”, “Hotel Yorba”, “We’re Going to be Friends”, “You’ve Got Her in Your Pocket”,”Well its True that We Love One Another” and “Never Far Away” (not White Stripes, but same time period) are amazing as always but there is something about hearing them back to back. [Look, I tried to cut it down, but its impossible given the amazing-ness of all those tracks]

Like all Third Man albums, definitely get this one on vinyl. It’s worth it.

I’d also recommend watching his awesome performance on Prairie Home Companion this week. Special mention that you should watch (or re-watch) the Catholic Throwdown between White and Colbert just because everyone needs it in their lives.

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To Do: Fall Floral Arrangements

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This week I also attended a fall pumpkin floral workshop here in Pápa. It was a TON of fun and I learned a lot. This was my first time arranging flowers in a pumpkin 🙂

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To Eat: This Pumpkin Soup + Veggie Burger

Chris and I had to take the car to Veszprém (about 45 minutes away) to complete an inspection for Hungarian insurance. While it took FOREVER (I swear I will never complain about American DMVs ever again) our lunch made the annoyance SO. WORTH. IT.

We stopped by Elefant Etterem es Kacevo for sandwiches and I fell in love. First pumpkin soup of the season–which was perfect for the day’s rainy and gloomy weather–plus my first veggie burger in Europe!

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Blurry because I was too excited to hold my phone properly.

Maybe the best veggie burger (not black bean based) ever?

To Read: Voices From Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster

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I’ve been meaning to read Voices from Chernobyl for a while and just started the book last week. The first time I studied the Chernobyl disaster was during my beginning semester of undergrad at Kent State. We were tasked with writing a paper from the perspective of a country’s tourist office, promoting certain aspects of a particular area that would encourage tourists to visit. For whatever reason I was assigned Ukraine and instead wrote a paper about how the Chernobyl disaster was largely covered up, overviewing how people in Ukraine, Belarus, and surrounding areas are still greatly affected by the fallout, and that the corrupt government continues to ignore this issues. #classicspilis

Voices From Chernobyl is a collection of stories from different people experiencing the disaster. From grandmothers forced to evacuate their homes, workers tasked with cleaning up after the disaster, and women taking care of sick family members and children born with developmental problems due to the meltdown, the book allows those directly affected by Chernobyl to tell their story.

“If we’d beaten Chernobyl, people would talk about it and write about it more. Or if we’s understood Chernobyl. But we don’t know how to capture any meaning from it. We’re not capable of it. We can’t place it in our human experience or our human time-frame. So what’s better, to remember or to forget?” (page 86).

Similar to This American Life, the power of the book is in the stories, providing the human connection to Chernobyl. This wasn’t a cut and dry disaster cleanup, but rather has so many intersecting narratives of family, culture, nationalism, health, and love that you wouldn’t know of without this type of collection. Voices From Chernobyl took over ten years to complete and earned Svetlana Alexievich the Nobel Prize for Literature.

To Look Forward To: Business of Disaster

A still running water pipe floods the foundation of a home destroyed by the storm surge of superstorm Sandy in the Staten Island borough neighborhood of Oakwood in New York

Hurricane Matthew tore through Haiti, Cuba, and the eastern coast of the United States this month; luckily for us we suffered no damage and all of our friends are okay, but there are a lot of people not as fortunate and need help (internationally and abroad. Omprakash is an organization trusted by a close friend if you’re looking to donate).

After essentially attached to the weather channel and Live 5 News–with a six hour time difference–I became really interested in how FEMA and flood insurance works should there be damage. Sure, the process of buying flood insurance has been explained to me but how do private insurance companies work with the federal government? The federal government with local and city governments?

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“Its Complicated.”

NPR and Frontline released The Business of Disaster detailing the complicated relationship of this private/public partnership and the impacts it has on taxpayers, particularly during disasters like Sandy and Katrina. Watch the documentary here.

Source for the graphic.

In order to make a new resiliency plan–considering storms will only become increasingly unpredictable and devastating from climate change–we need to first understand the systems in place. And how we can make them better.

Ashlyn (2)